The good life – A few days on Turtle Island

Monday, 16th of July, 2018 (2 days, 2 nights)

They are all islands in the Gulf of Thailand, but couldn’t be more different from one another. While Koh Samui is the busiest (and largest) of the three, Koh Pha-Ngan is somewhat more layed back. Koh Tao is not only the smallest of the three, it is also the sleepiest of the island group. As mentioned earlier, not much action can be expected before early noon, with people sleeping in and shops opening at random times during the day. The only folks up already in the earlier hours are the (skuba) divers, preparing for another day in the water. This is also the island’s main business – you can book a crash course and learn how to dive on your own in just a few days, with diving schools dotting the busy western shores of Koh Tao. All in walking distance from the main pier where catamarans drop off tourists in regular intervals.

Horizontal palm tree on Sairee Beach.

Strangely, I didn’t encounter many locals. Some may work in the bars and cafes, or rent you a room in one of the many rows of bungalows and resorts, but there does not seem to be a lot of “local life” taking place (anymore?). Not near Sairee Beach, anyways. It was much similar in the south. Chalok Baan Kao Bay had small shops and bars as well, plus some nice resorts and beaches. But as with Sairee Beach, foreigners were in the majority, sitting in beach restaurant, lounging on bean bags, or studying for diving certificates. There might not have been a lot of local settlement here to begin with, though. Small as the island is it might have been scarcely populated all along, with increasing tourism bringing over people from the mainland.

We quickly learned that Google Maps isn’t as reliable here as it was on the other two islands. We tried to get to Mango Bay in the North by motorbike, but were abruptly stopped at a dead end leading to a resort. A helpful employee of The Place was kind enough to point out that Mango Bay was best reached by taxiboat and only the Mango viewpoint could be reached by bike. Even that included some hiking, as he explained, and showed us many alternativ bays that were in fact reachable by motorbike. We took his advice, thanked him (he even let us keep a copy of a Koh Tao pocket guidebook) and we left in direction of the South.

Had it not been for that error in Google maps, though, we might not have discovered the Viewpoint Resort. Set on the tip of a small headland between Shark bay and Taa Toh beach, we  came across it’s inviting sun beds while looking for shells and small pieces of flotsam along the shores.

Putting up a shell token near Freedom Beach on Turtle Island!

As an outside guest you could use their infinity pool and sun beds for 250 Baht per person, but the nice woman managing the place suggested that she would give us access for free should we wish to eat lunch at their place as well. The weather was somewhat unstable that day, so we took her offer and spent the afternoon in the resort, baking in the sun and finishing novels.

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Disturbing me while reading the last pages of my thriller = a capital offense!

This was in fact a wise decision – suddenly the sky went dark, with big storm clouds assembling rapidly above the sea. It’s fascinating to experience how suddenly the weather can change here during monsoon season. One moment you see a few puffy white clouds above, with the sun peeking through every once in a while. Then you dose off for a few minutes and the next moment you startle awake to a raging thunder storm. I deeply enjoy swimming in the safe waters of a pool during heavy rain, though, and was quite content with the sudden weather change.

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Less than half an hour away from Koh Tao lies another beautiful place called Koh Nangyuan. This private island actually consists of three small rocky hills connected by a stretch of sand. You can either reach it directly by Catamaran from Koh Phangan or by long tail boat from Koh Tao. We choose the latter options since we preferred to leave our baggage in the bungalow. Not the wisest decision, because the sea got very rough that afternoon, and so the small taxiboats were not able to cross over anymore.

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